‘We want to help. We want to teach’

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A Lincoln couple with experience teaching in another state wants to help with Nebraska’s school staff shortage. But Desiree Feria Smith and her husband Nicholas said they were sidelined due to state regulations. the last three years. “I’m certified in Bilingual and Early Childhood Spanish through 6th grade,” Desiree said. We want to be here. We want to help. We want to teach,” Nicholas said. But they said state regulations are full of obstacles. “I got a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in educational administration, but neither of those retired to be a teacher in Nebraska,” Nicholas said. Nicholas said you must have a bachelor’s degree in education to receive a teaching certificate. In Texas, they were able to participate in a year-long alternative certification process that allowed them to teach. Adrianne Kruger told lawmakers about another hurdle during a hearing before the Legislative Education Committee on Monday. She is a student at Wayne State College. She wants to be a teacher. However, even if she gets a good grades, a standardized test is required for entry into the basic skills education program prevented her from taking the courses she needed to graduate. “During those three years, I considered changing majors, dropping out of college, and finding new avenues to move on,” Kruger said. Others said standardized testing required after graduation is also an expensive hurdle that is unnecessary. Jenny Benson, president of the association. Benson and other education leaders are backing three bills, which change testing requirements for teacher certification. LB 690, introduced by State Senator Tony Vargas, would eliminate all standardized testing. “Many states have moved away from the Praxis exam or core subject exams because they wanted to make sure teachers got into the classrooms. And what we are The discovery is that we need to be as nimble as possible,” Vargas said. State Sen. Carol Blood’s LB 690 gives the Nebraska Department of Education the ability to use courses to determine core competencies. “They need to give them options to let the balance be there let the people we hire be qualified,” Blood said. LB 1218 would also include a $1,000 loan forgiveness for student teachers. “, said State Senator Lynne Walz. “We have to work on how to break down these barriers,” Walz said. “Don’t try to lower the standards of academics. But explore other opportunities to get highly trained and qualified teachers in the state,” Nicholas said. Nicholas said they can apply for a temporary certificate that’s good for a few years while they work toward a degree. Blood said she is working on a bill for next year that would allow Nebraska to join a pact that would honor teaching certificates from other pact states.

A Lincoln couple with experience teaching in another state wants to help with Nebraska’s school staff shortage.

But Desiree Feria Smith and her husband Nicholas said they were sidelined due to state regulations.

“Here are two capable, willing teachers and because of bureaucracy or bureaucracy we are not able to do this,” Desiree said.

Both have taught in Texas for the past three years.

“I’m certified in Bilingual Spanish and Early Childhood through Sixth Grade,” Desiree said.

Nicholas said they recently returned to Nebraska to be closer to family after the birth of their first child.

They hoped to pick up where they left off.

“We want to be here. We want to help. We want to teach,” Nicholas said.

But they said state regulations are full of obstacles.

“I got a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in educational administration, but neither of those retired to be a teacher in Nebraska,” Nicholas said.

Nicholas said you must have a bachelor’s degree in education to receive a teaching certificate.

In Texas, they were able to participate in a year-long alternative certification process that allowed them to teach.

Adrianne Kruger told lawmakers about another hurdle during a hearing before the Legislature’s Education Committee on Monday.

She is a student at Wayne State College.

She wants to be a teacher.

However, even though she gets good grades, a standardized test required for entry into the Basic Skills Education program has prevented her from taking the courses she needs to graduate.

“During those three years, I considered changing majors, dropping out of college, and finding new avenues to move on,” Kruger said.

Others said standardized testing required after graduation is also an expensive hurdle that isn’t necessary.

“Students who have already demonstrated their abilities through ACT and who have successfully completed college coursework should not be faced with an expensive test that has no bearing on their future careers,” said Jenny Benson, president of the Nebraska State Education Association.

Benson and other education leaders are backing three bills, which change testing requirements for teacher certification.

LB 690, introduced by State Senator Tony Vargas, would eliminate all standardized testing.

“A lot of states have moved away from the Praxis exam or the core subject exams because they wanted to make sure teachers got into the classrooms. And what we’re finding is that we have to be as nimble as possible,” Vargas said.

State Sen. Carol Blood’s LB 690 gives the Nebraska Department of Education the ability to use coursework to determine core competencies.

“They need to have options so that the balance is there and the people we hire are qualified,” Blood said.

LB 1218 would also include a $1,000 loan forgiveness for student teachers.

“We’re at the point where, I hate to say crisis, but there are a lot of schools that have lost multiple positions,” State Senator Lynne Walz said.

“We have to work on how to break down those barriers,” Walz said.

Nicholas said the proposals would not remove enough bureaucracy to bring him and his wife back into the classroom.

But they said it was a step in the right direction.

“Not trying to lower the standards of academics. But exploring other opportunities to get highly trained and qualified teachers in the state,” Nicholas said.

“All we need to do is go back and get a four-year degree,” he said.

Nicholas said they can apply for a temporary certificate that’s good for a few years while they work towards a degree.

Blood said she was working on a bill for next year that would allow Nebraska to join a pact that would honor teaching certificates from other pact states.

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